Archive for the ‘Naga Setup – FPS’ Category

Naga Setup – FPS – Top View   Leave a comment

Naga Setup – FPS – Top View

Naga Setup – FPS – Top View

I created this template to help with your Razer Naga as it should be associated with general First Person Shooter configuration. This template considers the Top View of the mouse in regards to general FPS gaming.

As we are well aware, individual game keybind settings are not created equal. Each game comes prepackaged with it’s own idea of which keys or mouse buttons are best suited for the game at hand. This of course is known as the game’s default keybind settings. Some gamers are default setting die-hards and refuse to change any of these preset keybinds. If you are one of these people, this is not the website for you and thank you for visiting. Now, moving along, my goal here is to generalize or even standardize the keybinds so that whichever game you play, you will always know where each game function or weapon is.

Assuming you have already visited the Naga Setup – Synapse section of this website, i will move along to describe and explain more detail concerning in game functions for the Naga.

The obvious starting point would be mouse buttons 1 and 2 of course. These are set as fire 1 and fire 2 (secondary fire). In some games, fire 2 will alternately be assigned as zoom weapon. This is a good place for it as it is very comfortable to be able to zoom your weapon then fire it all within a moment’s notice.

Mouse button 3 (scroll wheel click) will be assigned to a custom field of view which will differ for each game and is most often set up in the game’s configuration file. This is a handy place for it as most games’ field of view is reset to it’s default state after utilizing the zoom function in game and needs to be customized on the fly after such action.

The mouse scroll wheel tilt left and tilt right functions will be unique to each game although their purpose will remain a constant. General utility is what we wish to assign here. Tilt left for your flashlight or to switch your ammo type down. Tilt right to toss a grenade, instantly annihilate your enemies, or to switch your ammo type up.

See those two mouse buttons just underneath the scroll wheel? These will prove very helpful in game. The top one will be used for in game quick saves. Just got locked in a room and faced with an unexpected boss battle? Tap this button without even taking your hands off of the mouse or keyboard and you’re safe. The bottom one will be used for in game quick cheats. It’s not an easy button to click accidentally so you can decide if and when you need to refill all of your ammunition, health or what have you.

Mouse button 4 will always be used as a switch function whenever possible. If the game provides an option to switch or to assign last weapon used or if a specific weapon in game inherently provides a switch function, this is where it will go. When a switch function in game is not available at all, then this button can and will be used as an alternative primary weapon.

Mouse button 5 will almost always be used to reload your weapon. This works in tandem with the R key on your keyboard so that you can sport dual reload. You can reload more efficiently with the option to do so on either side of the keyboard.

Mouse buttons 4 and 5 are per the above example and are further explained in the Naga Setup – FPS – Side View.

Game specific settings are listed in the Game Setup category.

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Posted October 20, 2014 by retropwned in Keyboard & Naga, Naga Setup - FPS

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Naga Setup – FPS – Side View   Leave a comment

Naga Setup – FPS – Side View

Naga Setup – FPS – Side View

I created this template to help with your Razer Naga as it should be associated with general First Person Shooter configuration. This template considers the Side View of the mouse in regards to general FPS gaming.

When set up properly, the thumb grid is a pleasure to use. Your thumb will lie naturally between the 2 and the 5 buttons which is easy to find as there is a valley or indentation between these two buttons found nowhere else on the Naga thumb grid. While in game, your hand will want to slide back on the mouse itself due to it’s large base, and with the natural curvature and trajectory of your thumb on the side of the mouse, you’ll find an area of comfortability from top left to bottom right on the thumb grid. This being said, buttons used most often should be kept left center to right and below. In layman’s terms, your thumb will feel more at home looking for 6 than it will for 10. With this in mind I also addressed the one/two punch system found in such games as Half-Life 2, wherein a quick SMG nade to the face followed by a dual shell shotgun blast coexist.

Primary 1, 2, 3, and 4, are where your most often used weapons should be bound. Primary 1 and 2 are where I usually bind my auto and semi-automatic weapons. Primary 3 and 4 are where I usually bind my one hit kill or up close and personal weapons. Primary 4 is special in that in fades into a Heavy 1 bind. Should the game not have a Primary 4 weapon then this button becomes your Primary Heavy weapon (rocket launchers come to mind), although should a fourth primary weapon be bound here then said rocket launcher would be bound to Heavy 2, and so forth. Heavy 2 should have the utmost devastating long range weapon bound to it, as it’s location requires conscious awareness to press it. An accidental rocket launch in a small room is not recommended.

Which brings us to Heavy 3, which is primarily Secondary 2/Quick, but it makes sense here in that any heavy weapon that could also be categorized as a quick secondary or a quick utility type should be bound here. Your thumb has a quick slap down to this button from it’s home position and it has an elevated lift molded behind it, so it makes an audible snap when you smoke it. Your thumb will be back to home position in no time, so as to set that SLAM, toss that grenade, or snap that photograph.

The Secondary buttons here are important. Secondary 1 lies right underneath the switch function, which oddly enough can be used as a secondary switch function. In games like Doom 3: Resurrection of Evil (original version) the Grabber weapon switches between the Grabber and Fists which lies right underneath the Switch button which switches between the flashlight and whichever weapon you were using last. Neat huh. The Secondary 2 button has an elevated lift molded behind it, which makes it easy to drag your thumb straight down from the switch button (which is where your thumb will rest naturally during game play) and pop whatever is bound there immediately, as stated above, the SLAM in Half-Life 2: Deathmatch or the research camera in both BioShocks’, comes to mind.

Scraps is where I bind anything that is useful, but either doesn’t fit into any of the other categories, or isn’t anything I would generally use in the heat of the moment.

Open 1 and 2 are buttons that my thumb either has to ‘reach’ for, or when pressed, move the mouse enough to disturb the laser pointer in game, so I try to bind only weapons or utilities here that are just about useless in game. Open 1 seems to disturb the laser pointer a bit less so I bind here first before moving on to Open 2.

On closing, feel free to swap binds to your liking in the configuration file.

A quick study of the above example will reflect general weapons placement on the thumb grid. The Naga Setup – FPS – Thumb Grid (vertical) description explains why this works best.

Game specific settings are listed in the Game Setup category.

Posted October 19, 2014 by retropwned in Keyboard & Naga, Naga Setup - FPS

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Naga Setup – FPS – Thumb Grid (vertical)   Leave a comment

Naga Setup – FPS – Thumb Grid (vertical)

Naga Setup – FPS – Thumb Grid (vertical)

I created this template to help with your Razer Naga as it should be associated with general First Person Shooter configuration. This template considers the Thumb Grid of the mouse in a vertical position in regards to general FPS gaming.

Here we take a much closer look at the thumb grid and why weapons are assigned to specific locations. Considering natural thumb curvature and reflex and the weapons tier system found in some games, I tested many variants until I was satisfied the configuration felt just right. We already know that your thumb will lie naturally between mouse buttons 4 and 5. This will create an area of traffic within the center of the thumb grid and as stated earlier, your thumb will also feel much more at home arcing through the bottom right quadrant on the inside of the grid so with this in mind we’ll keep weapons used most often in these areas.

Your thumb will feel extremely comfortable swapping between Primaries 1,2,3, and 4, even while moving around in game, so you want your most used weapons in these locations and with your thumb resting at home, you can choose a weapon then switch between whatever said function is at switch and the last most used weapon you chose. Also, while resting at Switch, Secondary 1 is an easy swap, it’s right behind it and a bit elevated, so it’s a great spot for a melee weapon or an important utility. Bring your thumb back once more and you have another secondary which is where your quick weapon or utility is; a great spot for it as even if your thumb overshoots this button, there is nothing behind it, so the end result is whatever is bound there.

Weapons tier systems, like that of Half-Life 2, most often contain a base weapon and an augmented version of that weapon; considering this, traffic area and natural thumb reflex, I have assigned the weapons so that they can be allocated with the least amount of thought process. Again, as your thumb will want to lie back on the mouse, you’ll notice a pattern of weapon placement which considers your thumb wanting to move downward on the thumb grid. You can see this is most prominent wherein the Drill and Drill Dash are placed as you must choose the Drill before you can utilize the Drill Dash. Also, notice how the lightning Gun and Hack Tool are set as secondary utilities. Each game’s weapons will vary but as you can see by the above example, similar categories will always reside in the same position. The Nailgun is similar to the Chain Gun. The Hyperblaster is similar to the Plasma Gun. You get the idea.

Regardless of how many different games you play, if you follow this guideline, you’ll always know right where to put that weapon and you’ll remember right where it is too because the setup is the same for each one. The goal here is to utilize the thumb grid buttons for active weapons as the keyboard keys are reserved for utility functions. This is completely described and explained in the Keyboard Setup – FPS category.

Game specific settings are listed in the Game Setup category.

Posted October 18, 2014 by retropwned in Keyboard & Naga, Naga Setup - FPS

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Keyboard Setup – FPS – Left Side   Leave a comment

Keyboard Setup – FPS – Left Side

Keyboard Setup – FPS – Left Side

I created this template to help with your keyboard as it should be associated with general First Person Shooter configuration when used in conjunction with the Razer Naga. This template considers the Left Side View of the keyboard in regards to general FPS gaming.

Veteran gamers will be very familiar with this side of the keyboard but will find it a bit getting used to now that all of the active weapons are assigned to the Naga. This is a beautiful thing though, as we now have a place in the standard WSAD setup for all of those ‘where do I bind these’ functions. Daunting it may seem but in reality it is quite simple. I will make this quick and painless as I explain each key from top left to bottom right.

Esc is our all purpose exit of course; when has it ever not been? It most often pauses the game and brings up the game’s main menu.

F5 will be assigned to the quick save function in game. It is the first key in the second row of function keys so it’s an easy one to remember as well. Earlier, we set up the Comma key for in game quick saves which in turn is bound to a mouse button which can be seen in the Naga Setup – Synapse – Top View.

Tilde ~ is our console as always. If you have no idea what an in game console is, find out then come back when you’re ready.

Tab is a familiar key in the multiplayer environment. It most often shows player scores and ranking along with various other information. What we will use this key for is not much different, although aside from the former we will also include any hints or maps to this key whenever possible.

Q and Z will have a special relationship here as both will be assigned to a zoom function, however, Q will be our go to zoom key as the toggle ability here will be disabled, whereas the Z zoom key will either have the toggle ability engaged or be used as a zoom cycle for games which contain weapons that might have that ability. One special mention though here about the Q key; it’s a go to key. It’s very easy to press with an extremely quick flick of your ring finger. Primary utilities, First Aid Kits, and the like should be assigned here whenever they are present in a game, unless it is being used as a primary zoom function. In this scenario, the zoom function can either be alternately assigned to the Z key, the right mouse button, or both.

E is our default use key almost always.

R is our default reload key almost always. It allows you to reload without moving the mouse pointer at all. Uber important.

T of course is our talk key. An active push-button for the microphone during multiplayer games, it becomes our play message button during a single player campaign.

F and G are very special keys. Think of them now as extensions of the E key. You’ll understand the benefit of these three keys being in tandem as we progress. F and G can best be explained as our extended utility keys. Imagine these keys as an alternative set of use keys only this time they play a specific role. We might open that door with E then set a trip mine right behind that door with F, search a corpse with E then quickly search it again with G, or decide between a rescue and a harvest between E and F.

Shift is most often a go between walk and run (sprint) key. Unless the game itself calls for the walk function specifically, I usually edit the configuration file so that walk speed in game is disabled. In some games a sprint key is unnecessary, in this case we can use the shift key as a utility counterpoint to the F and G keys. We never want to assign any function to the shift key that would affect our movement in an adverse manner, in fact, unless the game requires a sprint bind at all, I keep the shift key disabled.

X is our all purpose in game exit key. Exit scout mode. Exit vehicle. Exit stage left…

C and V are interesting keys. Early on in gaming the C and V keys were set default for crouch and prone respectively. As time went on, the C key was still being used for default crouch but somehow the default prone key was more often found at the Ctrl key. Eventually over time and with the advent of better keyboard manipulation, the default crouch key had migrated over to Ctrl permanently; default prone can be found anywhere between Ctrl and V and even as a double tap crouch cycle. I guess my point here is that C and V have become extra keys so to speak. I rarely bind V to anything as it is difficult for me to locate while in game, although I’ve heard some gamers say they use it all the time. I do use the C key though for game specific functions and I would think that V can be used the same way. Whatever works.

Ctrl is used for crouching, ducking and all variants thereof.

Disable your Windows key, now and forever.

Left Alt is an extra key for some. Slide your thumb over across the space bar and underneath your fingers for a quick function.

Space Bar. Jump. Done.

Now check out the Keyboard Setup – FPS – Right Side.

Game specific settings are listed in the Game Setup category.

Posted October 17, 2014 by retropwned in Keyboard & Naga, Naga Setup - FPS

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Keyboard Setup – FPS – Right Side   Leave a comment

Keyboard Setup – FPS – Right Side

Keyboard Setup – FPS – Right Side

I created this template to help with your keyboard as it should be associated with general First Person Shooter configuration when used in conjunction with the Razer Naga. This template considers the Right Side View of the keyboard in regards to general FPS gaming.

Not much going on here unless you are a southpaw.

Again, from top left to bottom right…

F9 will be assigned to the quick load function in game. It’s not an easy key to hit accidentally which is an ideal place for it.

F12 is for screenshots. Isn’t it?

10, 11, 12, Left and Right Brackets, Comma and Period, were all previously explained in the Naga Setup – Synapse section.

The Arrow keys are being used specifically as a mini control panel for the Steam Controller (details to come), although concerning the game Half-Life 2 Deathmatch it is also used; up arrow to spectate, down arrow to see the time left in a round; left wing are rebels, right wing are combine. What else is new?

Now check out the Keyboard Setup – FPS – Numeric Keypad.

Game specific settings are listed in the Game Setup category.

Posted October 16, 2014 by retropwned in Keyboard & Naga, Naga Setup - FPS

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Keyboard Setup – FPS – Numeric Keypad   Leave a comment

Keyboard Setup – FPS – Numeric Keypad

Keyboard Setup – FPS – Numeric Keypad

I created this template to help with your keyboard as it should be associated with general First Person Shooter configuration when used in conjunction with the Razer Naga. This template considers the Numeric Keypad of the keyboard in regards to general FPS gaming.

The numeric keypad on your keyboard has undergone a total conversion and has now become your cheat console.

Everything bound here is a cheat or some other function which will make life easier in game. Although a few of the keys are game specific, a method is present here.

Once more from top left to bottom right…

Fly, Walk, and No Clip. Pretty self-explanatory.

No Target, Custom FOV, and Buddha/Undying/God. God Mode is pretty self-explanatory.  The custom FOV function is already bound to mouse button 3 (scroll wheel click) but we bind it here as well just in case we need mouse button 3 for some other purpose. In some games, such as Doom 3 or Quake 4, a testlight function is available. This creates an area of light in front of you so that you can see your surroundings a bit better. The Buddha and Undying cheats function pretty much the same aside from the fact that you take no damage at all in God Mode whereas in Buddha or Undying Mode you will take damage until you reach health level 1.

The next row features your ‘I want it all’ cheats. Want your health and eve bars at maximum length? Hit 4. Want all of those weapons modifications? Hit 5. Want all of those research camera goodies? Hit 6.

The next row is for changing the game difficulty level on the fly for those games which allow for it.

The fat key on the bottom will be used to refill your wallet in games such as BioShock and the one next to that to refill your ADAM. These two keys can be used specifically for each game as they reside at the bottom of the keyboard right next to your mouse.

The Plus and Enter keys mimic the mouse Quick Save and Quick Cheat buttons.

Game specific settings are listed in the Game Setup category.